Monotheism: Core of Islamic Culture in Iran

  October 29, 2020   Read time 1 min
Monotheism: Core of Islamic Culture in Iran
Monotheism as the bedrock of Islamic worldview revolutionized Iranian culture. Of course, Iranians were not pagans before arrival of Iran and Zoroastrianism is also of monotheistic nature. However, Islam had the intellectual power enough for convincing the Iranians that the new reading of monotheism is more tenable and thus they easily converted.

Tawheed (monotheism) in Islam refers to the oneness of God, in the sense that he is one and there is no god but he, as stated in the shahādah (“witness”) formula: “There is no god but God and Muhammad is His prophet.” Tawhid further refers to the nature of that God—that he is a unity, not composed, not made up of parts, but simple and uncompounded. The doctrine of the unity of God and the issues that it raises, such as the question of the relation between the essence and the attributes of God, reappear throughout most of Islamic history. In the terminology of Muslim mystics (Sufis), however, tawhid has a pantheistic sense; all essences are divine, and there is no absolute existence besides that of God. To most Muslim scholars, the science of tawhid is the systematic theology through which a better knowledge of God may be reached, but, to the Sufis, knowledge of God can be reached only through religious experience and direct vision. (Source: Britanica).