The Dastgah Nava

  October 17, 2021   Read time 1 min
The Dastgah Nava
The last two dastgah systems are rather special as evidence of a process of evolution in the radif, for of all twelve systems, Nava and Rast Panjgah are least popular and are seldom performed today.

That they both have large repertories, are not now connected to any other systems, and were firmly established in the early versions of the radif by both Hedayat and Nasir, suggests that these dastgah are in the process of leaving the radif rather than entering it.28 One reason for their unpopularity might be their similarity to two of the most popular dastgah systems: Nava is similar to the dastgah of Shur, starting on its fifth degree; and Rast Panjgah is similar to Mahur. Because many present-day musicians are no longer especially interested in an extensive knowledge of the radif, they would be more likely to perform Shur and Mahur, which are extremely well known, than to go to the trouble of learning new repertory.

The scale of Nava (tune, or air) is like a natural minor scale with a slightly raised sixth degree or half-flat: C DE b F G A^ Β1" C. It bears a strong relation to the scale of Shur, as both tetrachords have the same configuration only their position is reversed, that is, Shur's tonic is Nava's dominant. The daramad of Nava does not have a clear profile in Examples 63-66. Characteristics that appear in each, although not in the same order, are a stressing of the tonic, C, and a descent to the shahed, A. Vaziri goes so far as to end on this A. Three examples end with the cadence figure f"-f"-c" (IV-I), called Bal-e Kabutar ("wings of the dove"). Although this figure is also found in other dastgah-ha, it is particularly characteristic of Nava. Important gusheh-ha of Nava are Gavesht on the second degree and Nahoft on the fifth. Rast tuning is G for tar and sehtar, C for santur, and A for violin.